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Have you *heard*? A new issue of Popular Science is on newsstands NOW!
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Regram from EIC Joe Brown, who has more photos on his IG 👉 @joemfbrown
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The new issue of @PopSci is screaming onto newsstands TODAY. It’s a topic we’ve wanted to cover for years: noise. It’s an instant classic, featuring everything from the sonic breakdown of a baby’s cry (*cough* I wonder where that idea came from *cough*) to the most mysterious sounds on Earth, with an avalanche of awesome science and gear packed in between. I’m beyond grateful to the writers, artists, and editors who made this issue so incredible..

Have you *heard*? A new issue of Popular Science is on newsstands NOW! —— Regram from EIC Joe Brown, who has more photos on his IG 👉 @joemfbrown —— The new issue of @PopSci  is screaming onto newsstands TODAY. It’s a topic we’ve wanted to cover for years: noise. It’s an instant classic, featuring everything from the sonic breakdown of a baby’s cry (*cough* I wonder where that idea came from *cough*) to the most mysterious sounds on Earth, with an avalanche of awesome science and gear packed in between. I’m beyond grateful to the writers, artists, and editors who made this issue so incredible. ...

play_circle_filled The world is a symphony, and a cacophony of aural experiences. Read—and hear—all about it in the Noise issue of Popular Science. Available on newsstands now, and rolling out all month at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci —

Cover: The Voorhees

Illustrations/Infographics: Sara Chodosh, Kyle Hilton, David Gil, Giacomo Gambineri, Meredith Miotke, Totto Renna, Eric Nyquist, AJ Frena, Joan Wong, Matteo Burton, Natalie Andrewson, Niv Bavarsky

Video: Stéphane Douady, NASA, EA, Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Walt Disney Studios, Pond5, Pexels, Pixabay

Audio: AGU/Geophysical Research Letters, T.G. Leighton (DOI: 10.5258/SOTON/D1136), Eran Amichai, NOAA, NASA, EA, Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Walt Disney Studios, Wikimedia Commons, freesound.org

Music: APM Music.

The world is a symphony, and a cacophony of aural experiences. Read—and hear—all about it in the Noise issue of Popular Science. Available on newsstands now, and rolling out all month at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci —

Cover: The Voorhees Illustrations/Infographics: Sara Chodosh, Kyle Hilton, David Gil, Giacomo Gambineri, Meredith Miotke, Totto Renna, Eric Nyquist, AJ Frena, Joan Wong, Matteo Burton, Natalie Andrewson, Niv Bavarsky Video: Stéphane Douady, NASA, EA, Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Walt Disney Studios, Pond5, Pexels, Pixabay Audio: AGU/Geophysical Research Letters, T.G. Leighton (DOI: 10.5258/SOTON/D1136), Eran Amichai, NOAA, NASA, EA, Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Walt Disney Studios, Wikimedia Commons, freesound.org Music: APM Music ...

Heads or tails? Yes. 🐶 Meet Narwhal, the adorable dachshund puppy with a second tail growing out of his forehead. How does something like this even happen? And will it ever wag? Here are five quick scientific facts to help you learn more about Narwhal (after you’re done gawking at his photos, of course.)
🐶 1. Similar to a cleft palate or extra toe, Narwhal’s forehead-tail is a congenital defect. Congenital defects are conditions that are present from birth. While some may result in physical, intellectual, or mental disabilities, Narwhal’s miniature unicorn horn, it appears, won’t cause him any issues.
🐶 2. The cause could be anything from genetics to environmental factors to toxins.
🐶 3. An X-ray showed no bony attachments to the tail, which means Narwhal will probably never be able to wag it. It’s essentially extra skin that is, for now, just short enough to avoid interfering with his vision.
🐶 4. Narwhal was discovered in rural Missouri, where there’s an epidemic of dumped dogs. He had minor frostbite on his back paw, and “probably would have frozen to death” if he hadn’t been rescued.
🐶 5. He now has over 150 adoption applications at Mac’s Misson (@macthepitbull), and his veterinarian Dr. Brian Heuring has high hopes for his future: “I think Narwhal has the opportunity to go into schools or hospitals and show people of all ages that sometimes being different is okay.”
🐶 Read more about Narwhal at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci.

Heads or tails? Yes. 🐶 Meet Narwhal, the adorable dachshund puppy with a second tail growing out of his forehead. How does something like this even happen? And will it ever wag? Here are five quick scientific facts to help you learn more about Narwhal (after you’re done gawking at his photos, of course.)
🐶 1. Similar to a cleft palate or extra toe, Narwhal’s forehead-tail is a congenital defect. Congenital defects are conditions that are present from birth. While some may result in physical, intellectual, or mental disabilities, Narwhal’s miniature unicorn horn, it appears, won’t cause him any issues. 🐶 2. The cause could be anything from genetics to environmental factors to toxins.
🐶 3. An X-ray showed no bony attachments to the tail, which means Narwhal will probably never be able to wag it. It’s essentially extra skin that is, for now, just short enough to avoid interfering with his vision. 🐶 4. Narwhal was discovered in rural Missouri, where there’s an epidemic of dumped dogs. He had minor frostbite on his back paw, and “probably would have frozen to death” if he hadn’t been rescued.
🐶 5. He now has over 150 adoption applications at Mac’s Misson (@macthepitbull ), and his veterinarian Dr. Brian Heuring has high hopes for his future: “I think Narwhal has the opportunity to go into schools or hospitals and show people of all ages that sometimes being different is okay.”
🐶 Read more about Narwhal at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...

play_circle_filled 💥 A thermonuclear blast on a pulsar resulted in the brightest burst of X-rays seen to date by @NASA's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) telescope.
💥 The explosion, which occurred on a pulsar known as J1808 on Aug. 20, 2019, released as much energy in 20 seconds as our Sun does in almost 10 days.
💥 Learn more at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci.

💥 A thermonuclear blast on a pulsar resulted in the brightest burst of X-rays seen to date by @NASA 's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) telescope.
💥 The explosion, which occurred on a pulsar known as J1808 on Aug. 20, 2019, released as much energy in 20 seconds as our Sun does in almost 10 days.
💥 Learn more at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...

How many homes will be underwater by 2100? New data just tripled the number.
🌊 When you hear how many people are living on land that might be underwater by 2100, you might wonder how we know exactly how high the sea level will be so far into the future. That kind of modeling is incredibly complex, and involves countless calculations and assumptions that influence the outcome. But you probably don’t wonder how we know the elevation of the *land*. In many parts of the world a quick glance at Google Maps can tell you how many feet above sea level you are at any given time.
🌊 But like anything we measure, our estimations of elevation are inherently error-prone. When you’re measuring how high a mountain is, being off by two meters (that’s 6.56 feet) is not a huge deal. But rising seas can make the same margin of error deadly for coastal areas. And that’s exactly what’s happening.
🌊 When researchers at Climate Central used a new method called CoastalDEM to estimate the elevations of the world’s coastal areas, the number of people vulnerable to sea level rise nearly tripled previous calculations. The new projection suggests up to 630 million people live in places that could be underwater by 2100, with more than half of those slipping under the rising seas by 2050.
🌊 Hit the #linkinbio to learn more about these updated charts and the new calculations 👉 @popsci
🗺: @sarachodosh.

How many homes will be underwater by 2100? New data just tripled the number.
🌊 When you hear how many people are living on land that might be underwater by 2100, you might wonder how we know exactly how high the sea level will be so far into the future. That kind of modeling is incredibly complex, and involves countless calculations and assumptions that influence the outcome. But you probably don’t wonder how we know the elevation of the *land*. In many parts of the world a quick glance at Google Maps can tell you how many feet above sea level you are at any given time.
🌊 But like anything we measure, our estimations of elevation are inherently error-prone. When you’re measuring how high a mountain is, being off by two meters (that’s 6.56 feet) is not a huge deal. But rising seas can make the same margin of error deadly for coastal areas. And that’s exactly what’s happening. 🌊 When researchers at Climate Central used a new method called CoastalDEM to estimate the elevations of the world’s coastal areas, the number of people vulnerable to sea level rise nearly tripled previous calculations. The new projection suggests up to 630 million people live in places that could be underwater by 2100, with more than half of those slipping under the rising seas by 2050.
🌊 Hit the #linkinbio to learn more about these updated charts and the new calculations 👉 @popsci 🗺: @sarachodosh ...

Two images of the same knee. Can you tell which MRI was created by artificial intelligence? 👉

Better yet, can you spot any differences? Researchers from Facebook and the NYU School of Medicine are working to run MRI machines faster by using #AI to create the images from the raw data the hardware produces—so a knee scan, for example, could take 5-6 minutes, instead of 10-12. That would be a huge benefit for the young, elderly, or unwell (not to mention, claustrophobic). And if you can't tell these two images apart, fear not: professional radiologists may not be able to, either. See an exclusive first look at this tech and read more about the collaboration at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci (For the record, the second image was created via artificial intelligence.).

Two images of the same knee. Can you tell which MRI was created by artificial intelligence? 👉

Better yet, can you spot any differences? Researchers from Facebook and the NYU School of Medicine are working to run MRI machines faster by using #AI to create the images from the raw data the hardware produces—so a knee scan, for example, could take 5-6 minutes, instead of 10-12. That would be a huge benefit for the young, elderly, or unwell (not to mention, claustrophobic). And if you can't tell these two images apart, fear not: professional radiologists may not be able to, either. See an exclusive first look at this tech and read more about the collaboration at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci (For the record, the second image was created via artificial intelligence.) ...

play_circle_filled 👀 MIT’s nine new Mini Cheetahs frolicking in fall leaves. Adorable or terrifying?
🍁 See more at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci.

👀 MIT’s nine new Mini Cheetahs frolicking in fall leaves. Adorable or terrifying? 🍁 See more at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...

play_circle_filled Happy Halloween from the

Happy Halloween from the "Jack-o'-lantern Nebula”! 🎃 Captured by @nasa 's Spitzer Space telescope, this carved-out cloud of gas and dust gained its nickname for obvious reasons. Who knew an O-type star 15-20 times heavier than the Sun sweeping surrounding gas and dust outward with powerful radiation flows could be so spooky? ...

💥 This fluffy ball contains the story of the universe. 💥 More than 10 thousand years ago, a star in our galaxy exploded. The light from this explosion didn't reach Earth until 1572, when the astronomer Tycho Brahe saw a burst of brightness in the night sky and mistook it for a new star being born. We now know that this flare was actually a white dwarf star going supernova—a violently explosive wave of energy and matter that a star emits as it dies. Nearly 500 years later, the imprint of that explosive burst is still visible—and it's very fluffy. 💥 @NASA recently released this image of Tycho's supernova remnant (also called

💥 This fluffy ball contains the story of the universe. 💥 More than 10 thousand years ago, a star in our galaxy exploded. The light from this explosion didn't reach Earth until 1572, when the astronomer Tycho Brahe saw a burst of brightness in the night sky and mistook it for a new star being born. We now know that this flare was actually a white dwarf star going supernova—a violently explosive wave of energy and matter that a star emits as it dies. Nearly 500 years later, the imprint of that explosive burst is still visible—and it's very fluffy. 💥 @NASA recently released this image of Tycho's supernova remnant (also called "Tycho"). The photo, taken by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, looks a bit like an opalescent dandelion or cotton candy cloud. 💥 Learn more about rhw “visually striking, and also scientifically meaningful" Type 1 supernova (its massive thermonuclear explosion let off a shockwave that moved at almost 3,100 miles per second!) at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...

SPOOKY SUN! 🎃 Even the fullest of moons have nothing on our home star’s fiery jack-o’-lantern impression.  @nasa captured this shot of active spots “carving” their way through the sun’s surface on October 8, 2014.
🎃 Learn more about how these spots form—and give off more light and energy than the rest of the sun’s surface—at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci.

SPOOKY SUN! 🎃 Even the fullest of moons have nothing on our home star’s fiery jack-o’-lantern impression. @nasa captured this shot of active spots “carving” their way through the sun’s surface on October 8, 2014. 🎃 Learn more about how these spots form—and give off more light and energy than the rest of the sun’s surface—at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...

play_circle_filled Have you listened to this week’s  @weirdest_thing podcast? It’s a doozy with a very special guest! Hit the #linkinbio for the full episode. ・・・repost via @weirdest_thing : 
This week, @helenzaltzman joins @rafeltman and @sarachodosh on the show, and enlightens us with the history of the word bisexual. Bisexual letters! Bisexual situations! Bisexual musical instruments! Bisexual space stations! You won’t want to miss this. Hit that link in our bio to listen to the full episode! .
#applepodcasts #podcasts #podcast #audio #weird #history #bisexual #linguistics #language #english #history #medicine.

Have you listened to this week’s @weirdest_thing podcast? It’s a doozy with a very special guest! Hit the #linkinbio for the full episode. ・・・repost via @weirdest_thing : This week, @helenzaltzman joins @rafeltman and @sarachodosh on the show, and enlightens us with the history of the word bisexual. Bisexual letters! Bisexual situations! Bisexual musical instruments! Bisexual space stations! You won’t want to miss this. Hit that link in our bio to listen to the full episode! . #applepodcasts #podcasts #podcast #audio #weird #history #bisexual #linguistics #language #english #history #medicine ...

Fluorescent turtle embryo 👀
🐢 This year’s winner of Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition is actually a compilation of hundreds of separate images. Captured by microscopy technician Teresa Zgoda and recent university graduate Teresa Kugler, the embryo was difficult to capture due to its large size—it was over an inch long and thick. Consequently, only a small piece of the turtle embryo could be focused on at one time. Zgoda and Kugler had to stitch and stack together over a hundred images to create the final shot.
🐢 “Microscopy lets us zoom in on the smallest organisms and building blocks that comprise our world— giving us a profound appreciation for the small things in life that far too often go unnoticed,” said Kugler. “It allows me to do science with a purpose.”
🐢 See more finalists at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci.

Fluorescent turtle embryo 👀 🐢 This year’s winner of Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition is actually a compilation of hundreds of separate images. Captured by microscopy technician Teresa Zgoda and recent university graduate Teresa Kugler, the embryo was difficult to capture due to its large size—it was over an inch long and thick. Consequently, only a small piece of the turtle embryo could be focused on at one time. Zgoda and Kugler had to stitch and stack together over a hundred images to create the final shot. 🐢 “Microscopy lets us zoom in on the smallest organisms and building blocks that comprise our world— giving us a profound appreciation for the small things in life that far too often go unnoticed,” said Kugler. “It allows me to do science with a purpose.” 🐢 See more finalists at the #linkinbio 👉 @popsci ...